CHILD ARCHIVE
0

A new protein channel family

Exposure of cells to acidic conditions outside the cell activates chloride-conducting channels that influence physiological and pathological processes. Yang et al. used an unbiased RNA interference screen to identify the channel protein that allows...

CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
0

Cell Death Processes Are Reversible

In 2007, Ho Man “Holly” Tang took a break from her undergraduate biology studies at Iowa State University to join her older brother, Ho Lam “Hogan” Tang, then a doctoral student at the Chinese...

CHILD ARCHIVE
0

Single-Cell Sequencing of iPSC-Dopamine Neurons Reconstructs Disease Progression and Identifies HDAC4 as a Regulator of Parkinson Cell Phenotypes

Highlights • Single-cell RNA-seq stratifies patients with similar clinical presentation • A pseudotemporal profile aligns single cells along a control to disease axis • HDAC4 is mislocalized to the nucleus in PD patient iPSC-derived...

CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE
Rendering of white blood cells. (Credit: iStockphoto/Henrik Jonsson) 0

Roadblocks removed by rapid evolution

Cellular metabolism is an interconnected network of chemical reactions, each step catalyzed by dedicated enzymes. Inhibition or intentional removal of an enzyme should grind the pathway to a halt, a fact exploited by many...

CHILD ARCHIVE
0

CD95/Fas ligand mRNA is toxic to cells

CD95/Fas ligand binds to the death receptor CD95 to induce apoptosis in sensitive cells. We previously reported that CD95L mRNA is enriched in sequences that, when converted to si/shRNAs, kill all cancer cells by...

CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE
0

SRPKIN-1: A Covalent SRPK1/2 Inhibitor that Potently Converts VEGF from Pro-angiogenic to Anti-angiogenic Isoform

Highlights •SRPKIN-1 is the first irreversible inhibitor for SRPK1/2 kinase •SRPKIN-1 is the first kinase inhibitor that targets a tyrosine residue covalently •SRPKIN-1 inhibits phosphorylation of serine/arginine (SR)-rich splicing factor proteins •SRPKIN-1 blocks angiogenesis...

CHILD ARCHIVE
0

Migration without a nucleus

When cells migrate, they normally do so by adopting a characteristic polarized morphology with the nucleus seemingly pushing from behind. The internal cytoskeleton forms well-organized arrays, and the mechanics within the cell, as well...

CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE
0

Science Forum: The Human Cell Atlas

Abstract The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell...

CHILD ARCHIVE
0

Precision medicine using microbiota

Accumulating evidence indicates that dysregulation of microbiota-host interactions associates with various diseases, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), colorectal cancer, diabetes, and liver cirrhosis (1). Recently, research has generated paradigm shifts in concepts about the...

CHILD ARCHIVE
0

Ribosomes ignore the stop sign

Aminoglycoside antibiotics bind to bacterial ribosomes and inhibit protein synthesis. Eukaryotic ribosomes, in contrast, are not strongly inhibited by these molecules but show errors such as inaccurate translation and read-through of stop codons. Prokhorova...

CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
0

NADPH oxidase-mediated redox signaling promotes oxidative stress resistance and longevity through memo-1 in C. elegans

Abstract Transient increases in mitochondrially-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate an adaptive stress response to promote longevity. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases produce ROS locally in response to various stimuli, and thereby regulate...

CHILD ARCHIVE CHILD ARCHIVE
CHILD ARCHIVE